18 March, victory over the Allies and the strange story of a Turkish submarine…

Today, 18 March is the anniversary of the opening volleys of the Gallipoli Campaign. The date is also marked locally as ‘Victory Day’. The Ottoman Turkish victory over the Allies at Gallipoli. In fact the naval battle on March 18 has nothing to do with Gallipoli at all…… Since the outbreak of war and Turkey’s

The Amazing escape of Captain T.W White of the Flying Corps…

I’m currently working on a piece which I hope will become a tour for enthusiasts wanting to learn more of the stories of ANZACs or Australian military imprisoned as POWs in WW1. Came across this brilliant and barely told story of Capt. T.W. White of the Royal Australian Flying Corps. On 1 August 1914 he

The Lone graves of Gallipoli.

One common understanding that we all have about Gallipoli is that it was a tragedy of epic proportions. That men travelled from the ‘Ends of the Earth’ to meet in battle on the plains, ridges, gullies and beaches of this beautiful place. A place that has seen the clash of civilisations for longer than the

Once Were Warriors – Indigenous ANZACs and a Family Connection.

Being an avid historian of the Gallipoli Campaign and Australian history in general, I find it heartening to explore the alternative stories of ANZAC. On a recent trip back to Australia to visit my family and expose my young daughter Jasmin to her Aussie roots, I came across a fascinating story from my Brother-in-law Bill.

Following William Henry Ebbitt of the Wellington Mounted Rifles………. a pilgrimage with William’s son.

I know I harp on continually about how everyone either comes to Gallipoli with their own story. Either loaded up with facts and figures of their relative’s time here during the campaign. Or they come totally afresh, with no family connection at all. Just a thirst to explore this part of  our history. To walk